Tag Archives: International Students

Seeking H1B for Just a Few Years

It is a common career goal to work in another country for a couple of years for that global experience.  International students come to the US for an education and hope to stay for at least a few years for this very reason.  US Citizens look for international experience themselves for this very reason.  After that time, they typically plan to return to their home country to be close to family and their home.  From a completely internal point of view, that is natural and perfectly acceptable.  For employers, it’s an entirely different story.

It costs thousands of dollars to recruit, hire, train and replace employees in today’s marketplace.  In many positions, it takes almost a year if not more for a candidate to get up to speed with all of the ins and outs of a position and company.  It is expensive to hire and retain the best in today’s market.  Therefore, it is incumbent upon the employer to identify talent who will not just succeed in the short term but also long term with a career with that organization.  It’s just good business sense.

What should international students do about this news?  They should structure their career decisions and job search plans to match that of business’s need today.  You may eventually want to return to your home country one day.  Someone within the United States might take a position in another state with the hopes of returning closer to home one day.  But, don’t forget that as a job seeker, you are marketing a product to a prospective employer.  The employer is the buyer.  As the manager of your job search marketing campaign, you must align your goals with the needs of business today.  You want to be employed in a profession that matches your goals, strengths and experience.  At the end of the day, business hires people who can help the company make money.  They want to hire people who can learn the company and stay long enough to make a profitable impact on the organization.

The sweet spot for any career manager is to identify where your goals and skills overlap with those of a prospective employer.

 

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Career Prep Before the MBA Program

It’s the time of year when prospective MBA students are looking towards leaving their current employers and transitioning back to the world of academics. Almost every reason a prospective MBA student has for applying to B-School comes down to career. Whether they want to dramatically change professions or the trajectory, MBA candidates seek to change something in their careers. As with any new initiative, people start out extremely motivated and ready to work. At the beginning of their programs, most MBAs aggressively nod their head at advice from their career coaches and promise to stay actively engaged in their job search. Naturally, this energy starts to wane after the grind of academics kicks into high gear. After students begin to realize the amount of time and energy their academic program requires, they start to prioritize their time which sometimes results in the job search being moved down the list. Some students move their job search down the list farther than others, but suffice it to say that job search energy will decrease to some degree within the first month or two of an MBA program.

Knowing the importance of a successful job search in addition to the importance of successful academics, consider implementing the following early to get ahead of the job search process:

  1. Connect with your career advisor (coach) this summer to begin identifying your goals, strengths and weaknesses in regards to your future career goals. Learn what areas in regards to your job search that will require coaching and refining, so you can spend less time making mistakes this fall. National Career Fairs and internship postings start popping up on the calendar very early; therefore, MBA candidates must be prepared to compete effectively in the market.
  2. Start writing your resume NOW! Refrain from taking your original resume and adding a few updates. Start from scratch and construct a targeted resume that presents your professional brand. Seek professional advice from your career coach and learn how to write a new resume that connects your past accomplishments and experiences with your future goals and the skills needed for success with a potential employer.
  3. Join the professional organization most respected in your field of study. Anyone returning to school for a career in human resources should join the local and national chapters of the Society for Human Resources Management. Be sure to not just stop at joining the organization and looking for the next national conference. Engage with other members. Contact the organization officers or board of directors and ask questions on how you can get involved. Look for ways to connect and learn from others in your chosen profession. Share information with other members through a LinkedIn group or Twitter. Show the membership that you are eager to learn and someone to meet. The best way to do this is to focus on being interested in others. Be interested in career paths, companies, and latest trends in HR, etc. Help others help you.

One of the worst things that a potential MBA student can do is wait until the last minute to start thinking about how to activate the search for an internship. The typical professional job search can take upwards of eight months. Waiting to start your job search until the time you begin your academics will most definitely ensure that one of the two will have to suffer. The best job search approach is one that is steadily active and involves great initiative. Start today by seeking ways you can kick start your job search before you arrive on campus and establish a activity rhythm that will sustain you during the busiest of times. Don’t miss the perfect opportunity due to poor planning.

 

 

 

 

21 Day Job Search Improvement Challenge

Happy New Year!!!!

As I sit down to write my first blog for 2013, my thoughts go back to the last blog I wrote for 2012.  Your Job Search Resolutions for 2013  In that entry, I talked about challenging yourself to resolutions that will improve your job search practices.  Please reread the suggestions I outline.  I hope a few make their way into your job search plan this year.

Studies show that you can create a habit if you continue something for 21 days — some good and some not so good.   Today’s generation uses the word “like” at least once in almost every sentence.  They didn’t start this habit overnight, and they won’t stop overnight either.  It takes time — 21 days.  I challenge you to take the next 21 days and change some of your bad job search habits.  Here are a few recommendations:

1.  Manage your jobsearch part time not in your free time.  Let’s face it, we do not have free time.  Saying that you will do something in your free time just doesn’t happen anymore.   Maybe you need to treat your job search like a class period or maybe you can just mark time on your calendar easily and stick to the schedule.  Whatever you do, you have to plan your work and work your plan.  You can’t just plan to work out and get in shape.  You have to actually work out.  So, schedule time for your job search and stick to that time doing something productive.  Do that for 21 days in a row.

2.  Emphasize a high touch / high tech balanced job search.  If you only apply to positions online, your chances of failure are extremely high.  You must network your way to key hiring managers in the organizations to succeed.  It is difficult to find the right person who knows about the position in which you applied and can get you to the right hiring manager.  But, you can’t ignore that the number one way vacant positions are filled is through inside direct referrals.  Does it take a long time to complete the online application?  Yes.  Does it take time, effort and perseverance to network effectively?  Yes.  Does it get frustrating?  Absolutely.  Nonetheless, you have to measure your career goal against the time you are willing to put into reaching this goal.  Maintain this balance for 21 days.

3.  Stop sounding desperate.  When you have bills piling up, getting a paycheck is the goal.  When you need a job, you need a job.  But, keep in mind that hiring decisions are made the same way you shop.  Have you ever purchased something because the vendor needs your business?  Would you hire a chef to rewire your home for electricity because that company needs your business? Of course not.  You would hire a company that specializes in fulfilling your needs.  Be very careful in marketing yourself as a jack of all trades lest you be known as an expert of nothing.  We purchase and hire excellence.  If you find yourself telling people you can do anything, then I challenge you to redesign your job search marketing plan.  Do this for 21 days.

In order for you to break your old job search habits, you must first accept your plan in the past isn’t working for you.  Maybe you have been able to apply online and get a job in the past.  Maybe you are from cultures that focus on placement as opposed to personal branding to succeed.  Whatever your past experience, anyone wanting to climb the corporate ladder must accept that with a more advanced career will come a more advanced process in managing your career.

Are you up for breaking your old habits and taking the 21 Day Job Search Improvement Challenge?

 

 

5 Job Search Tips for International Students

The first question I am asked of International Students who join our program at A&M is how an international student can be have a successful job search in the United States.   We talk networking, yet those new to our country worry their only network is in their home country.   International students struggle with approaching companies of interest only to be told the company does not sponsor H1B Visas.  I could go on for paragraphs talking about the struggles.  Let’s cover my top five tips for any international student seeking employment in the US.

1.  First and foremost, the main goal upon graduation is to be employed in your area of interest.  PERIOD!  If you want to go into consulting, then your main goal is to find employment in consulting.  Right?  This means, you have to look for employment opportunities in the United States, your home country or anywhere in the world.  This is the same advice I give domestic students.  Never lose sight of the main objective which is to be employed upon graduation in your field of interest.

2.  Secondly, you must build a network.  And believe it or not, you do have a network in the United States. LinkedIn proves it.  You may not have direct contacts just yet, but everyone has indirect networks readily available through Alumni databases, LinkedIn Groups and a general Google people search.  Look for alumni from your undergraduate program who are currently in the US and working for companies of interest to you.  Join LinkedIn groups directed to your profession.  Look for individuals or groups of individuals who have gone through the process before you and start building rapport.  Please visit some of my previous posts on how to initiate converations through Social Media outlets or those I have shared through Twitter.

3.  Decrease the amount of time you spend “Applying Online.”  Creating a job search strategy that includes next steps after the application to creatively connect with Alumni or hiring managers.  Never forget that a successful job search makes “applying online” a step in the process not the entire process.

4.  Check with your campus career center and see if they subscribe to GoingGlobal.  This service is one my favorites for International Students. It provides Visa and job search trends around the world as well as a list of companies by state and city that applied for and received H1Bs in the previous year.

5.  Purchase a copy of Dan Beaudry’s amazing book “Power Ties:  The International Student’s Guide to Finding a Job in the United States.”  While this is my fifth tip, it might be the most important of all.  I have almost worn out my copy with my continuous reference back to some of his tried-and-true suggestions.  I keep my copy within reaching distance, and you should as well.

It is no secret that International Students seeking employment in the United States have challenges to overcome, but it is important to remember that your ultimate goal is to be employed in a position and with a company that brings you fulfillment and joy.  Remind yourself of that everyday and best wishes for a successful job search and future career.